Who is The Michigan Gaming Control Board? Part 1: Executive Director

People are Appointed by the Governor. Their time is up, they leave and new appointees come in. So let’s examine what qualifications these individuals have to mand so many people whose fate they hold. And why in the world was Horse Racing ever put under them.

In November 1996, Michigan voters approved Proposal E, effectively authorizing three licensed casinos to be built in Detroit. Proposal E was later substantially improved and strengthened, then signed into law as the Michigan Gaming Control & Revenue Act, as amended (Public Act 69 of 1997; MCL 432.201).

The Act:

  • Authorizes up to three licensed commercial casinos in the City of Detroit
  • Vests the Michigan Gaming Control Board (a Type I state agency within the Michigan Department of Treasury) exclusive authority to license, regulate, and control the three authorized Detroit casinos
  • Authorizes the MGCB to promulgate necessary Administrative Rules to properly implement, administer and enforce the amended Act
  • Provides for the licensing, regulation, and control of casino gaming operations, manufacturers and distributors of gaming equipment and supplies, casino employees, and those who participate in gaming
  • Establishes licensing standards and procedures for issuance of casino licenses, casino supplier licenses, and casino employee licenses
  • Imposes civil and criminal penalties for violation of the Act
  • Authorizes and imposes certain taxes and fees on casinos and others involved in casino gaming
  • Provides for the distribution of casino tax revenue for K-12 public education in Michigan, and for capital improvement, youth programs, and tax relief in the City of Detroit
  • Creates certain funds for the operation of the Board to license, regulate and control casino gaming; and funds for compulsive gambling prevention programs and other casino-related State programs
  • Requires certain safeguards by casino licensees to prevent compulsive and underage gambling
  • Prohibits political contributions by certain persons with interests in casino and supplier license applicants and licensees to state and local political candidates and committees
  • Establishes a Code of Ethics for members, employees and agents of the Board, license applicants, licensees, and others involved in gaming.

MISSION STATEMENT

“The Michigan Gaming Control Board shall ensure the conduct of fair and honest gaming to protect the interests of the citizens of the State of Michigan.”

Executive Director

Mr. Richard S. Kalm was appointed by Governor Jennifer M. Granholm, on March 29, 2007, as Executive Director of the Michigan Gaming Control Board.

Mr. Kalm, the Executive Director of the Michigan Gaming Control Board, oversees a staff of 119 full-time and 22 part-time employees. He succeeds Daniel J. Gustafson, who resigned as of May 2007. Mr. Kalm, of Romeo, most recently served with the Macomb County Sheriff’s Office, where he has more than 30 years experience. Prior to his retirement, he held the all ranks at the Sheriff’s Office from Deputy Sheriff through Captain, and Division Commander, retiring as the Chief of Staff. Mr. Kalm earned his Bachelor’s Degree from Wayne State University.  His professional training includes the F.B.I. National Academy in Quantico, Virginia, the Criminal Justice Leadership Academy at Lansing Community College, and Critical Incident Management at Northwestern University. He is a member of the Southeastern Michigan Chiefs of Police, the FBI National Academy and North American Gaming Regulators Association.

As a former law enforcement officer, I am very honored to head an agency that has some of the toughest gaming regulations in the country. My goal is to strive to be the finest gaming control operation in the US, which will assure the people of the State of Michigan that the commercial casino industry and horse racing is honest and fair. I am committed to protecting this source of revenue for the State of Michigan and maintaining the highest integrity of gaming throughout this State.

REALLY?

“he held the all ranks at the Sheriff’s Office from Deputy Sheriff through Captain”.

Well with all that LAW enforcement background and FBI training, why then did he fire Patrick J. Devlin?

In 2001 Mi. Gov. hired three Regulation Officers, Patrick Devlin was one of them and was assigned to the  Indian Gaming Section.

Dated June, 3, 2008   Patrick Devlin filed a lawsuit against the Attorney General Mike Cox because he didn’t feel Mike Cox was enforcing the law with Indian Owned Casino’s being made to comply with the LAW in obtaining Liquor Licenses. 

Two days after this lawsuit was filed with his concerns over this lax in the law consequently got him first suspended then fired by MGCB Executive Director Richard Kalm. ( The guy with all the Sheriff experience and FBI training ).

Thus Patrick Devlin filed suit against Richard Kalm. Defendants are Richard S. Kalm (Executive Director, MGCB), Frederick J. Cleland (Deputy Director for Licensing, MGCB), Eric T. Bush (Administrative Manager, MGCB), Dale E. Beachnau (Human Resources Administrator, Michigan Department of Treasury), Micheal Davis (Labor Relations Representative, Michigan Department of Treasury), Dominick P. Alagna (Casino Employee Licensing Manager, MGCB), and Janet M. McClelland (Acting State Personnel Director, MGCB). 

While employed at the Michigan Gaming Control Board (MGCB), Devlin filed two citizens suits in state court seeking to compel enforcement of the state’s liquor licensing laws and the MGCB’s employee qualification rules ( suggested Reading ) .  After newspapers quoted Devlin in articles about these citizen suits, the MGCB terminated Devlin’s employment.  Devlin filed the present federal suit against various state officials,[1] and, later on the same date, Devlin grieved his termination in the Michigan Civil Services Commission (MCSC).[2]  In his federal suit, Devlin alleges that his termination violated his rights under the First Amendment, the Due Process Clause, and state law, and he seeks injunctive and monetary relief.

Back to the article that stated Devlin said Monday he was told he was being suspended for noncompliance with directives. Michigan Gaming Control Board Executive Director Richard Kalm said Devlin was suspended pending an investigation into behavioral and employment issues, not because he filed the lawsuits.Yet, Devlin said  he was told he was being investigated for noncompliance with directives, “but they refused to tell me the general or specific nature of the directives, or when the alleged conduct occurred.”

You see what I’m interested in is another part also Stated: The suit also questions the board’s approval of an applicant’s bid to buy a stake in a casino, noting the applicant previously had been rejected. The applicant and casino were not named in the suit.

Now in 2008 The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians already owned Greektown but were going through bankruptcy. A federal judge approved an exit plan for the Tribe yet in 2010 The MGCB precipitated that federal judges order and voted to give Greektown to another group. And the Tribes Director Lana Causley stated: “By approving a transfer of ownership to people who have not yet passed the background checks the MGCB has demanded and performed of all previous owners, the MGCB has set a dangerous precedent and potentially harmed the integrity of commercial gaming in Michigan.”.

So one has to wonder if Patrick Devlin’s firing in fact happened not only because he filed suit over Mike Cox’s refusal to make all the Tribal Casino’s comply with the State’s liquor licensing but also because he was questioning the exact same thing Lana Causley objected to? So also I wonder who the applicant previously rejected was but now ( in 2008 ) wasn’t? And if indeed it was Greektown and this transfer to a new group.

Seems Patrick Devlin was made out by several to be the bad guy here. How dare he even suggest that all should comply with the liquor licenses.

BY JENNIFER DIXON… June 5, 2008

 

Patrick Devlin, a lawyer and employee of the Michigan Gaming Control Board, has sued Michigan Attorney General Mike Cox in an effort to force him to require the state’s 19 tribal casinos to obtain liquor licenses.

Devlin, a former assistant attorney general, said that while American Indian tribes generally do not have to comply with state laws, he believes they must follow state liquor laws, which require establishments that sell liquor to be licensed and regulated by the Michigan Liquor Control Commission.

Devlin, who until Monday monitored tribal casinos for the gaming control board, has pressed state officials for four years to address his concerns that Michigan should be regulating liquor sales in the tribal casinos. Devlin, who is now a regulation officer assigned to Detroit’s three casinos, filed his suit Tuesday in Ingham County Circuit Court.

Rusty Hills, a spokesman for Cox, said Wednesday the agreements that allow tribal casinos to operate in Michigan are negotiated by the tribes and the governor’s office.”If Mr. Devlin has a beef, he should bring it to the attention of the governor’s office,” Hills said. “And he’s not only an attorney but a former employee of the AG’s office; he should know better.”

Devlin said it is important that the casinos are regulated like other establishments in Michigan that sell liquor to protect against drinking by minors or the visibly intoxicated. Kathryn Tierney, attorney for the Bay Mills Indian Community, which operates two Upper Peninsula casinos, said the tribes have been regulating their casino liquor sales themselves for years.

“The tribe’s law has a minimum age, 21, and prohibits serving visibility intoxicated people,” Tierney said. “This is not a vacuum which only state law can fill.”

“While the attorney general has zero tolerance for all kinds of conduct, he apparently has unlimited tolerance for tribal casino violations. He just gives them a free pass,” Devlin said.

Rusty Hills, director of the honors program and expert on Michigan casinos, said there are many different aspects to why Devlin would want the tribal casinos to obtain liquor licenses.

“From a legal standpoint I don’t understand this,” Hill said. “The federal government is the only one that can do it.”

According to the Detroit Free Press, Devlin said it is important casinos are regulated like other establishments in Michigan that sell liquor to protect against drinking by minors or the visibly intoxicated.

However, Hills said one of the reasons he believes Devlin would be doing this t is to get money from the tribal casinos with license fees.

“Maybe the turn around is (the state) is going to charge the casinos a huge license fee,” Hills said. “It almost seems like this is trying to get more money out of the casinos.”

***

Well Mr. Hills back to The MGCB MISSION STATEMENT by Richard Kalm.

I am committed to protecting this source of revenue for the State of Michigan and maintaining the highest integrity of gaming throughout this State.

But if Patrick Devlin does his job and questions some lack of practices, Rusty Hills, director of the honors program and expert on Michigan casinos says,  “Maybe the turn around is (the state) is going to charge the casinos a huge license fee,” Hills said. “It almost seems like this is trying to get more money out of the casinos.”

And why is this a bad thing? Sounds to me like Patrick Devlin just wanted the law to be enforced equally.

Whole Article:

The Soaring Eagle Casino, along with the 18 tribal casinos in Michigan, is allowed to sell alcohol without a liquor license.

But each may face some opposition. Patrick Devlin, a lawyer and employee of the Michigan Gaming Control Board, has sued Michigan Attorney General Mike Cox to force him to require the state’s tribal casinos to obtain liquor licenses.

Rusty Hills, director of the honors program and expert on Michigan casinos, said there are many different aspects to why Devlin would want the tribal casinos to obtain liquor licenses.

“From a legal standpoint I don’t understand this,” Hills said. “The federal government is the only one that can do it.”

According to the Detroit Free Press, Devlin said it is important casinos are regulated like other establishments in Michigan that sell liquor to protect against drinking by minors or the visibly intoxicated.

However, Hills said one of the reasons he believes Devlin would be doing this t is to get money from the tribal casinos with license fees.

“Maybe the turn around is (the state) is going to charge the casinos a huge license fee,” Hill said. “It almost seems like this is trying to get more money out of the casinos.”

Long fight Devlin is a former assistant attorney general, and until June 2 was monitoring tribal casinos for the gaming control board. He has pressed state officials for four years to address his concerns because tribes are considered sovereign nations. Devlin, who is now a regulation officer assigned to Detroit’s three casinos filed his suit June 3 in Ingham County Circuit Court. Representatives for Devlin and Cox could not be reached for comment.

The Michigan Liquor Control Commission may grant a limited number of liquor licenses in Michigan to stimulate economic development, according to Michigan.gov

****

HUGE LICENSE FEES? What to obtain liquor licenses?  Well let me tell you Mr. Hills there is certainly a lot of FEES being paid by HORSE RACING. So WHY NOT TRIBAL CASINO’S WITH THEIR LIQUOR?

Annual Report to the Governor 2009 LICENSEES AND LICENSES ISSUED 

LICENSEES AND LICENSES ISSUE The ORC licensed 4,653 individuals who held a total of 5,541 licenses. Some licensees hold more than one license. The ORC issues licenses for owners, trainers, assistant trainers, drivers, jockeys, apprentice jockeys, veterinarians, farriers, racing officials, track and association employees, grooms, stable help, vendors, corporations, partnerships, and temporary licenses for authorized people to access various restricted areas of the track. There are 58 licensing categories.Licensing forms are available online at and can be downloaded and submitted in person at one of our licensing offices or via fax. Each track has an ORC field office that is open during live racing. Office hours vary by track and schedules are posted on the website.

But the MGCB cut the Pinnacle Race Course meet from 84 days to 31, to 8 then 3. And Why? No Funding???

But God forbid the Tribunal Casino’s should be made to get Liquor Licenses. Then to have an Idiot who is director of the honors program suggest Patrick Devlin is holding these Casino’s up with a gun.

Pinnacle was the one who was held up by the MGCB and Richard Kalm.

This is The MGCB EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. He suspends a man doing his job who had the audacity to question why Tribunal Casino’s are not being made to do what every other business in Michigan who wants to sell alcohol does. Then fires him. And who’s in the picture again, MIKE COX.

And I’d still like to know the who when he also questioned the board’s approval of an applicant’s bid to buy a stake in a casino, noting the applicant previously had been rejected in 2008?

My research for the time being has not turned up an answer. But one last thing on Richard Kalm. I would have loved to know what his answers were on Page 1 of these first 7 questions for why he wanted this job and his qualifications for it.

http://www.senate.michigan.gov/gop/committees/governmentoperations/2007-07/kalm.pdf

From what I’ve read from the Greektown Casino heist from The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, to the firing of a man who thought these Tribunal Casino’s outside of the Detroit area should be required to obtain liquor licenses like everybody else. One idiot thought making Michigan Money from these licenses was a sin of some sorts. And the man who fired him after he filed suit against Mike Cox lying to him that it was over behavioral and employment issues, not because he filed the lawsuits.Yet, said  he was told he was being investigated for noncompliance with directives, “but they refused to tell me the general or specific nature of the directives, or when the alleged conduct occurred.”

And now he wants answers from Jerry Campbell about Taxes and Land Deals?

As far as I’m concerned Kalm’s dealings have tarnished all that Law Enforcement History behind his Resume he gave. Seems now he’s just as crooked as a POLITICIAN.

Part 2: The 4 Board Members and I will tell you who the 4th vote was on Greektown. And with absolutely no qualifications for the job he was appointed to in Febuary 2010. Nor has he any knowledge at all of the subject of Casino’s much less Horse Racing.

To be Continued….

1 Comment

Filed under Government, Law Enforcement, Michigan Horse Racing, News, Pinnacle Race Course, Politics, The Michigan Gaming Control Board

One response to “Who is The Michigan Gaming Control Board? Part 1: Executive Director

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